Sandrine Schaefer | Pace Investigations No. 3 as part of [Image Here]

  • Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts 24 Quincy Street Cambridge, MA, 02138 United States
Sandrine Schaefer, Pace Investigations No. 2, photo by Daniel DeLuca, 2016

Sandrine Schaefer, Pace Investigations No. 2, photo by Daniel DeLuca, 2016

Sandrine Schaefer | Pace Investigations No. 3

performed as part of [Image Here]

Interdisciplinary Conference & Exhibition

SATURDAY, APRIL 9, 2016

09:30:00am-03:30:15pm

 [Image Here]

Interdisciplinary Conference & Exhibition

Presented by Film and Visual Studies, Harvard University

April 7-10, 2016

Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts

Harvard University

24 Quincy Street

Cambridge, MA 02138

imagehere.altervista.org

Pace Investigations No. 3 is a performance comprised of actions that respond to the Carpenter Center and its surrounding areas. Sandrine repeatedly cycles through this performance 9 times over 6 hours. Each cycle of the performance loses time. As this occurs, the actions in the performance must shift. Some actions become unrecognizable from previous cycles. Some are abandoned, while others increasingly gain significance. This is an exercise that confronts the complex relationship between the human body and its relationship to time.  This is an exercise in identifying the essential. It is an exercise in surrender. It is an exercise designed to fail.

Cycle 1 = 09:30:00am-12:30:00pm

Cycle 2 = 12:30:00pm-02:00:00pm

Cycle 3 = 02:00:00pm-:02:45:00pm

Cycle 4 = 02:45:00pm-03:08:00pm

Cycle 5 = 03:08:00pm-03:19:00pm

Cycle 6 = 03:19:00pm-03:25:00pm

Cycle 7 = 03:25:00pm-03:28:00pm

Cycle 8 = 03:28:00pm-03:29:30pm

Cycle 9 = 03:29:30pm-03:30:15pm

To see documentation from Pace Investigations No. 1 and Pace Investigations No. 2 visit SandrineSchaefer.com.

The [Image Here] conference will bring together papers, performances and artworks in order to elaborate the role of non-representation as a theory and/or practice in recent contemporary philosophy, media theory, art, and related fields. Not simply a blank, the phrase [image here] functions as a placeholder—a formatted but unpopulated space. A page under construction, a refusal to show or be shown, an empty frame. Marking what is indicated but not given, [image here] simultaneously exposes and withdraws from the logic of representation. Drawing out these questions of negation, withdrawal, and resistance to representation, the conference will cover topics ranging from sonic, affective and atmospheric experience to digital and machinic logics, to eco-media and post-minimalist art.

Keynote Lecture: Sven Lütticken, University of Amsterdam

Carpenter Center B-04, Friday, Apr 8th, 5:30pm

“Nuclear Art”

This talk will examine artistic and activist responses to the nuclear regime from Hiroshima to Fukushima. A number of different genealogical strands will be analyzed, with an overall focus on the problematization of the visual by the advent of nuclear physics and nuclear power. As one author put it, radiation is terribly 'discrete.' How have artists engaged with the aesthetic and political problem of this lacking sensuous presence?

Special performances by:

Trisha Donnelly

Eli Keszler

Sandrine Schaefer

Hito Steyerl (video performance)

Accompanying Exhibition

Apr 6 – 17, 2016

Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts Lobby

Drawing together works that confront logics of representation, the exhibition [image here] will stage commissioned sound installation and performance pieces alongside archival material, video essays, experimental documentation, and mobile architecture. These works will be provided in collaboration with Eli Keszler, James Hoff, Oliver Laric, Hito Steyerl, metaLAB, Harvard Art Museums, Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT, Woodberry Poetry Room, and Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts.

Exhibition provided with support from Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies, the Lasky-Barajas Dean's Innovation Fund for Digital Arts and Humanities, and the Provostial Fund for the Arts and Humanities.